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Advisory Board

Laurent Bach, PhD, is Associate Professor in Economics at the University of Strasbourg, and member of the BETA research group (University of Strasbourg/CNRS). His research activities are mainly in the field of Economics of Innovation, and especially the analysis of Science, Technology and Innovation policies and the evaluation of their socioeconomic impact. He has been strongly involved in/or led most of the evaluation studies performed by the BETA since the late 80s (for EU, OECD, ESA, various public authorities and agencies at international, national and local levels).

Laurent is also interested in the development dynamics of sectors such as the space industry and more recently the creative industries such as music industry. He has published in Journal of Technology Transfer, Research Evaluation, Scientometrics, International Journal of Technology Management, Science and Public Policy, Technovation, etc.

 

Andrew Harrison studied chemistry at Oxford (BA, 1982; Doctorate 1986) before striking out in independent research on magnetic materials, first as a Royal Society University Research Fellow (1988) and then as a lecturer in chemistry at the University of Edinburgh (1993). He was appointed professor of Solid State Chemistry in 1999, and in 2002 he became founding Director of the Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions in Edinburgh, which was established to explore the properties of materials and life at extremes of pressure or temperature or magnetic fields. The technique that underpinned most of this research was neutron scattering so in 2006 he seized the opportunity to become Scientific Director of the world’s leading centre for neutron science, the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble. He became Director General of the ILL in 2011 before moving back to the UK in 2014 to become the CEO of Diamond Light Source, the UK’s national synchrotron facility at the Harwell Campus.

Andrew has chaired EIROForum, the collection of European international infrastructures, including CERN, ESO and ESA. He serves on advisory bodies for institutes and organisations in Germany, Russia, Japan, Finland and the USA, and is currently a UK delegate for the ESFRI Council of the European Commission for which is also on the ‘Physical Sciences and Engineering’ Strategic Working Group and also a member of special working groups on Neutron Scattering Facilities in Europe and on Long Term Sustainability of Research Infrastructures.  He is also Chair of the Association of European-level Research Infrastructure Facilities (ERF AISBL), the organisation that represents European research infrastructures not represented in EIROForum.

 

Laura Hillier is the Director of Performance, Analytics and Evaluation at the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). She leads a team responsible for monitoring corporate performance and assessing the outcomes and impacts of the investments in research infrastructure made by the CFI. Laura has a keen interest in methodologies for research impact assessment that provide relevant and useful information while not disadvantaging any type or area of research. She works collaboratively with others in the Science & Technology community to ensure the team’s work meets the needs of the CFI and its stakeholders.

Laura holds a BSc in Biology, an MSc in Epidemiology and the Canadian Evaluation Society’s Credentialed Evaluator (CE) designation. She has worked in research evaluation at three different funding organisations over the past 10+ years. Laura brings to her work in research performance and impact assessment past experience working across the different areas of health research – basic biomedical research, clinical research, health services research as well as population health research.

 

Jan Hrušák is senior research fellow and scientific advisor at the Czech Academy of Sciences. He completed studies in physical chemistry and received PhD (Dr.rer.nat) in 1987 at the TechnicalUniversity Leuna-Merseburg (Germany), before joined the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. In 1990 he moved to TU Berlin to work with H.Schwarz in theoretical chemistry. In 1995 accepted a position at the J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, where, after spending one year as visiting professor at the Institute of Molecular Science at Okazaki (Japan), he is working since. Jan Hrušák served two terms in the executive body of the Czech Academy of Sciences, and he has been appointed for two years Director general for research at the Ministry of Education, youth and sport of the Czech Republic (MEYS). He is longstanding ESFRI member (currently vice-chair) and the Czech delegate to ERAC. (c. 100 scientific papers, 3500 citations)

 

 

Eskil Mårtensson is a Development Strategist at Region Skåne, Sweden. He has a Bachelor´s degree in Human Geography at Lund University. As a generalist he is dedicated to working with development, growth and challenges at a strategic level. Over the course of his career, Eskil has worked with many different aspects of regional development. Cross-border cooperation has been a key issue throughout. He has been involved in writing two generations of the Regional Development Programme for Skåne, especially focusing on interregional and global issues. He has been responsible for the process of choosing thematic objectives for the current Interreg OKS program (Oresund-Kattegat-Skagerrak; Sweden-Denmark-Norway) and has been coordinating the political cooperation between Sweden and Denmark at a regional level, promoting the development of a common cross-border labour market.

Eskil is currently the Project Manager of the Interreg project ESS & MAX IV: Cross Border Science and Society, involving 27 partners in Sweden, Denmark and Norway – including eight universities and the research facilities ESS and MAX IV in Lund, Sweden. The 3-year project runs until August 2018, and the budget is €19m (50% from the EU Interreg OKS), making it the biggest Interreg-project so far in the OKS Programme. The main goal of the project is to develop regional strengths, such as Materials Science and Life Science, using the potential of the world-leading research facilities ESS and MAX IV. The goal is to increase the number of young researchers who can use the facilities, combined with international marketing strategies, business involvement and talent attraction/retention etc. Synergies, new research networks and exchange of cross border knowledge are keys factors in the project.